Success in Social Media: The Path

How do you measure success in social media? I’ve been asked this many times during interviews, and I always answer the same way: any and all interactions that place your brand in a positive light. Many people might disagree with me and focus more an metrics and numbers, but if we look at the path social media marketing has taken in the past few years, you will see that the measure of success has shifted into a more subjective realm. Does that mean the metrics and numbers don’t matter? Of course they matter! That’s the point of marketing, isn’t it? But in social media, the marketing aspect has quickly shifted over to branding, presence, and overall engagement with your followers.

Let’s take a look at the original metric that social media marketers used to measure success: Followers. The more followers you had, the better, right? Having a huge number of Likes on Facebook means that people actively sought out your page, clicked the Like button, and would then receive news and updates whenever you post them. Well, at the time it was the only important metric you had.

Social media marketers then started to focus on creating viral content, and the measure of virality was the number of Likes and Shares a post received. In came the flood of clickbait titles, “Like if you agree” image macros, and “Share if you love your mother” posts. Companies wanted to know that their content was being consumed, or, with the changes to the Facebook algorithms, seen by their followers. We’re at the tail end of this practice now, and we’re quickly shifting over into forming direct, emotional connections. Frankly, I feel like this should’ve been where we started as social media marketers.

How do you create emotional connections with your followers? Just check out the tagline of this blog: Be more human. That the adage by which I formulate my social media strategies, and companies and brands should pay attention. Be more human. Just take a look at the first word in “social media”! It’s “social”! The more you advertise and broadcast to your followers, the faster they get fed up with your content, which means they’re more likely to just ignore you. When that happens, say goodbye to your organic reach, which means you pay more to advertise your content, which exacerbates your problem. Literally throwing your money away. People on social media don’t want to be bombarded by ads on a daily basis. To reach them, you have to become like one of them, which means using the social media site as it’s intended: to create connections with people on a personal level. The playing field is already set; you just have to play the game instead of trying to create your own rules!

Each social site has its own expectations of etiquette and behavior. On Tumblr, for example, you’re expected to have fun and not take yourself too seriously. On Instagram, you need to show of your staff and show everyone what you’re up to. On Facebook, you want to be the person starting conversations and share your opinions (just be careful about this part).

If you’re likeable to the point where people can relate to you, they will take the time out of their day to support you. So how do you measure success in social media? Be more human today.

Are Your Apps Compromising Your Privacy?

The world has gone mobile, and that means millions of apps are being installed every day on smart phones, tablets, and other devices that rely on Internet access. What most people don’t know is that when they download an app, they are subject to user agreements that allow the owners of the apps to collect personal and private data that will be shared with advertisers. You might think that apps like Facebook, WhatsApp, and other social media platforms would be the worst offenders, but according to Forbes staff Parmy Olson, the worst offenders are actually games like Fruit Ninja and Angry Birds. Locational data is one of the things these apps collect. The game developer doesn’t care where you play, but the advertisers who pay the game developers to include their ads in the app most definitely do.

App Grades

PrivacyGrade.org Database Scores on User Expectations VS Actual App Behavior.

You might’ve noticed that apps nowadays will inform you about what type of data they collect before you finish installing it. As an advocate for transparency in all facets of life, simply stating that your data is being collected is not enough; the developers of these apps and games should let you know exactly where your data ends up, who’s buying it, and for what purpose. On the other hand, it’s a little understandable that free apps require advertisers in order to stay in business. But it’s also important not to confuse this data collection with up-front advertising on certain free apps that allow you to pay a small fee to remove ad banners. This fee only pays for your right not to be advertised at directly, It does NOT mean they stop collecting your data! It only means that you’ll be advertised to later through a different medium.

So how far does this go? How much data is being collected? A driving apple called Google Waze collections your locational data, but it also shares this data with local governments! Doesn’t that strike you as “Big Brother” behavior? It’s not a matter of whether you have something to hide, but rather a reasonable expectation of privacy within your own property – including your car and where you’re going every day! It can go further than that. Last month Twitter unveiled Fabric, a platform for building mobile apps. Included in the tools is something called Digits, which is used to send SMS Registrations to people signing up for mobile app services. Normally this would an expensive undertaking for the owner of the app, but with Digits, Twitter would be paying for the text delivery. However, Twitter also gets to keep the phone numbers for advertising purposes. This behavior isn’t explicitly explained to anyone downloading or registering for the app!

So the question remains: Are your apps compromising your privacy? YES, absolutely they are! The more important question is this: do you care enough to make changes to your mobile behavior?

When You TELL Your Story, You SELL Your Story

Every once in a while it’s nice to see a credible source confirming your ideas on marketing and social media, namely how you should approach supposed “best practices” that seem to rehash the same strategies over and over again. It makes you wonder if there has been any progress in the industry, or if the writers of these articles are just summarizing other people in a huge circle of paraphrasing that leads nowhere. In any case, I’ve always pushed for companies to use social networks in a very basic way: as a social network rather than just a marketing tool. This means your company or business needs to have a personality. It needs to have a story. Check out this TED Talk with Simon Sinek, says “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”

The most important circle, the center of everything, is WHY you do something, and that’s where your story comes in. The “why” does not mean “to make a profit”, but rather a personal statement on what you’re trying to achieve independent of whether or not people want to buy your product. What does your company’s mission mean to you, CEO? What special significance does the product have for you, Social Marketer? Look at number two on this Forbes article titled “Increase Customer Acquisition by 400% With Storytelling“: Be a trusted person not trying to sell something. This incredibly important method of utilizing social networks for marketing purposes requires you to be a person whose personality emulates that of an expert fan of your company. You need to be as enthusiastic about your product as your most loyal customer, providing information in palatable, easy-to-understand terms, as well as an inside look at the company’s inner workings. The person you hire to fill this roll needs to be an inside source for your audience, a spy that can give them exclusive information in a seemingly secretive way, but also on a highly visible stage: social media sites. Be human. Sound human. Something as simple as a reminder any questions can be handled through private messaging or even a form on your site will create an open and welcome environment for your target audience. Once you find a healthy balance between human activities and company marketing, you’re going to reach people in a more meaningful way.

Are Businesses the Bane of Social Networks?

The support of big corporations means big money for any site, especially social networks like Facebook and Twitter, but does business involvement ruin the social experience for everyone? I think so. If you introduce money and profit into social networking, then the entire package becomes a business. The social network needs revenue to pay for ever-expanding server and maintenance costs, and businesses want to advertise to as many people as possible; what better way to do so that with social media? It’s where people focus their attention, not only during downtime, but also during work, on lunch breaks, and any time a free moment presents itself. We are a connected generation, and for that reason alone we are being sold to the highest bidder, often from right under our noses. Most people don’t even realize it?

So what about you is being sold? Information, of course. Every time you visit a site, click a link, click into and out of a social network, or read an article, data about you is being collected using tracking cookies. Your behavior, your likes and dislikes, the activities and interactions between you and your family – all of this is being monitored, quantified, and studied in order for corporations to advertise to you more effectively. Why are clickbait articles so rampant? Because people on social networks are clicking on them. Each site featuring these clickbait articles and lists knows exactly where you came from, who shared the referral link, how long you spent on their site, and how often you click on similar articles. They then pay Facebook advertising money to shove more of the same articles into your newsfeed. Don’t you ever wonder why ads seem to only feature things you’ve looked at or are interested in? It’s because you’re being watched.

When a social network cares more about the money it makes and less about the communities it fosters and the connections its users make with each other, it starts to show over time. Facebook’s Pages now longer have the organic (unpaid) reach it used to, because, according the Facebook admins, they want reduce SPAM. The people most affected by this: small companies, start-ups, and people who want to get a leg up in a vast community that used to be a treasure trove of potential followers. You can access the people you want to follow your Page…you just have to pay to make it happen. So no, Facebook, it’s not about reducing SPAM. You’re a multi-billion dollar company. You can find a way to fix this problem without hamstringing everyone who can’t afford to pay.

Paid Advertising on Social Networks: The New Reality

People new to the game of Facebook might get the impression that there’s no way to break into the social media scene due to the abysmal organic reach percentage. As a result, new businesses might be completely turned off, especially when they’re trying to get a handle on their finances and simply cannot afford to invest in paid advertising on the world’s largest social network. It hasn’t always been this way. Many companies who have been with Facebook from the creation of the Facebook Page grew their following without having to pay a single dime. This is because Facebook used to be free in every sense of the word: no advertising, no promoted posts, and certainly no paid apps! But as the network became more popular, more and more companies began using Facebook as one of the primary methods of reaching people directly, which led to all the paid marketing options. As these options rolled out, everyone began experiencing a huge decrease in organic reach, some dropping as low as 2.1%. Abysmal seems like an understatement with numbers like that!

Facebook isn’t the only one to make paid advertising and promoted posts their only options for increasing your reach. Twitter, renown for its hashtag system, also offers promoted tweets and ad options with a built-in analytics system. Pinterest rolled out their Promoted Pins, though only for select companies at the moment. Unlike Facebook, the latter two do not punish their users by reducing their organic reach. Their functions remain the same, while the paid options are an add-on. Of course, Facebook denies purposely reducing organic reach for monetary gains, stating that the new system by which the site ranks content was implemented to reduce spam. Yes, it does reduce spam, but no, it doesn’t prevent spam by any measure. The only thing it seems to do consistently well is stop non-paying Facebook Pages from reaching their customer base. One positive thing it does is punish those who try to cheat the game by buying fake Likes. The more fake Likes you have, the worse your organic reach will be. Not that it isn’t insanely bad already. It’s just a cherry on top.

So what can we do? Paid options are a part of the game now. New users and small companies will need to work extra hard to create quality content relevant to their potential followers in order to entice them to share. But not on Facebook. They frown on external links.

Social Media Snafoo – How to Handle the Fallout

Okay, you’ve made a huge little mistake, and you didn’t notice until a torch-wielding mob has descended upon your Twitter feed. What do you do? What can you do? Apologize? Ignore the issue? Clarify exactly what went wrong? There are many ways to approach a problem like this, but it’s quite evident that you should be as honest and open as possible. Let’s take a look at one of the most recent incidents with Digiorno Pizza and a trending hashtag, #WhyIStayed.

Let’s lay down a little background information: #WhyIStayed was used to share stories of domestic abuse in order to create a vocal support network for women in light of the domestic violence case involving Janay Rice and her husband, former NFL player Ray Rice. Digiorno, seeing the trending hashtag, decided to use it with the quip “You had pizza”. The reception was not pretty. The pizza company soon discovered their mistake and went into damage control immediately. In my opinion, they handled it exceptionally well. Digiorno openly admitted to the mistake, that the tweet was sent without first researching what the hashtag meant. They’ve even gone as far as responding to individual tweets with personalized messages and apologies, not a copied and pasted statement that looks like it was drafted by a lawyer. Yes, I believe it was an honest mistake (I’ve made a few myself before quickly deleting a tweet), but when you’re a large corporation, there’s only so much you can do. Media coverage have boldly stated that Digiorno’s tweet “backfired” as though the company did it on purpose. With the current fight for women’s rights and equal rights in America, that’s simply not the kind of publicity you want! At all! For the sake of the genuine issues at hand (women’s rights, reporting domestic violence, and speaking out against abuse), I say we let this one go. It’s not like the pulled Enetenmann’s and just pulled out of Twitter completely for several years hoping people would forget about #NotGuilty. Short answer: we didn’t. And remember the Union Street Guest House, a wedding venue that charged $500 for every bad review they received on Yelp? The moment owner Chris Wagoner said the so-called “policy” was a joke that was never removed, over 3000 reviews bombarded Yelp and dragged their 5-star rating down to just one star. If he was being honest, no one believed him (and neither do I). Sometimes a practice is so bad that not even the best attempts at damage control can fix the issue.

So what can we learn from this experience? First, do your research and don’t hashtag blindly! Just because a hashtag or topic is trending does not mean is a positive trend. It takes just a few minutes to find out what it’s about, and a few minutes will save you months of grief and possibly thousands of dollars in damage control.

Social Logins: Who Did You Let In? [Stickied to Top Now]

social-login3Think before you click. If you shop online, you’ve probably seen it before: social login buttons that allow you to create a brand new account with a website without filling out the usual forms. If you thought voluntarily filling in those annoying little boxes with your personal information was getting a little too close for comfort, can you imagine the kind of information you’re giving up by allowing them access to your social media accounts?!

Let’s get one thing straight: unless you outright lied about every bit of information about yourself or fiddled around with the security options onfacebook-personal-profile-marketing-work-education-settings-public the social network account you’ve chosen to use at a social login gateway, you’re handing over all the information you’ve mistakenly (or unwittingly) marked as “Public”. This includes your birthday, Pages you’ve liked, friends you’ve connected to, everything on your wall, your personal websites, other social media account usernames you listed, etc. But you’re not the only victim here. Even your friends who have Public profiles will have their data collected simply because they’re connected to you. And there you have it, ladies and gentlemen: the nature of social media marketing as we see it today. Have you even read Facebook’s Data Use Policy?

This type of information collection has its drawbacks. You can’t filter out irrelevant data, and you’ll get tons of it in the dragnet. However, it will help build a scarily accurate portrait of individuals who have already signed up for your services. By logging in with your social media account, you’re doing the equivalence of clicking “Agree” in the Terms and Agreements segment of every piece of software you’ve ever installed without actually reading the Terms and Agreements. Once you put your data out there, it’s no longer yours to keep, alter, or hide. Think before you click.